Famous in Daman and Diu (DD)

Daman and Diu, a union territory in west India, consists of 2 separate areas divided by the Arabian Sea. The Daman Ganga River flows through the coastal town of Daman. Diu is a small island and mainland village. The Fort of Moti Daman, Diu Fort and 16th-century churches reflect the territory’s past as a Portuguese colony. In the town of Moti Daman, the Basilica of Bom Jesus Church is known for its gilt altarpiece. For over 450 years, the coastal enclaves of Daman (Portuguese: Damão) and Diu on the Arabian Sea coast were part of Portuguese India, along with Goa and Dadra and Nagar Haveli. Goa, Daman and Diu were incorporated into the Republic of India on December 19, 1961, by military conquest. Portugal did not recognise the Indian annexation of these territories until 1974. The territory of "Goa, Daman and Diu" was administered as a single union territory until 1987, when Goa was granted statehood, leaving Daman and Diu as a separate union territory. Each enclave constitutes one of the union territory's two districts. Daman and Diu are approximately 650 kilometres away from each other by road.